Tag: Small Business

Why Can’t We Create More Jobs in America? Too Much Dam Regulation!

No Comments

The true story below shows our government in action and crystalizes why there has not been more job creation in our country… Yes, this story has been verified in Snopes. First read the letter from the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) – then read the awesome reply from the property owner.

SUBJECT: DEQ File No.09-59-0023; T11N; R10W, Sec 20; Lansing, Michigan

Dear Mr. DeVries:

It has come to the attention of the Department of Environmental Quality that there has been recent unauthorized activity on the above referenced parcel of property. You have been certified as the legal landowner and/or contractor who did the following unauthorized activity:

Construction and maintenance of two wood debris dams across the outlet stream of Spring Pond.

A permit must be issued prior to the start of this type of activity.. A review of the Department’s files shows that no permits have been issued. Therefore, the Department has determined that this activity is in violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws, annotated.

The Department has been informed that one or both of the dams partially failed during a recent rain event, causing debris and flooding at downstream locations.. We find that dams of this nature are inherently hazardous and cannot be permitted. The Department therefore orders you to cease and desist all activities at this location, and to restore the stream to a free-flow condition by removing all wood and brush forming the dams from the stream channel. All restoration work shall be completed no later than January 31, 2010.

Please notify this office when the restoration has been completed so that a follow-up site inspection may be scheduled by our staff. Failure to comply with this request or any further unauthorized activity on the site may result in this case being referred for elevated enforcement action.

We anticipate and would appreciate your full cooperation in this matter. Please feel free to contact me at this office if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

David L. Price District Representative and Water Management Division

=====

Here is the actual response sent back by Mr. DeVries:

Re: DEQ File

SUBJECT: DEQ File No.09-59-0023; T11N; R10W, Sec 20; Lansing, Michigan

Dear Mr. Price,

Your certified letter dated 11/17/09 has been handed to me. I am the legal landowner but not the Contractor at 2088 Dagget Lane, Trout Run, Lansing, Michigan.

A couple of beavers are in the process of constructing and maintaining two wood ‘debris’ dams across the outlet stream of my Spring Pond. While I did not pay for, authorize, nor supervise their dam project, I think they would be highly offended that you call their skillful use of natures building materials ‘debris.’

I would like to challenge your department WebdesignsSanAntonio to attempt to emulate their dam project any time and/or any place you choose. I believe I can safely state there is no way you could ever match their dam skills, their dam resourcefulness, their dam ingenuity, their dam persistence, their dam determination and/or their dam work ethic.

These are the beavers/contractors you are seeking:

As to your request, I do not think the beavers are aware that they must first fill out a dam permit prior to the start of this type of dam activity.

My first dam question to you is:

(1) Are you trying to discriminate against my Spring Pond Beavers, or

(2) do you require all beavers throughout this State to conform to said dam request?

If you are not discriminating against these particular beavers, through the Freedom of Information Act, I request completed copies of all those other applicable beaver dam permits that have been issued. (Perhaps we will see if there really is a dam violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Pennsylvania Compiled Laws, annotated.)

I have several dam concerns. My first dam concern is, aren’t the beavers entitled to legal representation? The Spring Pond Beavers are financially destitute and are unable to pay for said representation — so the State will have to provide them with a dam lawyer.

The Department’s dam concern that either one or both of the dams failed during a recent rain event, causing flooding, is proof that this is a natural occurrence, which the Department is required to protect. In other words, we should leave the Spring Pond Beavers alone rather than harassing them and calling them dam names.

If you want the damed stream ‘restored’ to a dam free-flow condition please contact the beavers — but if you are going to arrest them, they obviously did not pay any attention to your dam letter, they being unable to read English.

In my humble opinion, the Spring Pond Beavers have a right to build their unauthorized dams as long as the sky is blue, the grass is green and water flows downstream. They have more dam rights than I do to live and enjoy Spring Pond. If the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection lives up to its name, it should protect the natural resources (Beavers) and the environment (Beavers’ Dams).

So, as far as the beavers and I are concerned, this dam case can be referred for more elevated enforcement action right now. Why wait until 1/31/2010? The Spring Pond Beavers may be under the dam ice by then and there will be no way for you or your dam staff to contact/harass them.

In conclusion, I would like to bring to your attention to a real environmental quality, health, problem in the area. It is the bears! Bears are actually defecating in our woods. I definitely believe you should be persecuting the defecating bears and leave the beavers alone. If you are going to investigate the beaver dam, watch your dam step! The bears are not careful where they dump!

Being unable to comply with your dam request, and being unable to contact you on your dam answering machine, I am sending this response to your dam office.

THANK YOU,

RYAN DEVRIES & THE DAM BEAVERS

An open letter from the founder of the small business that employs you…

3 Comments

To All My Valued Employees,

There have been some rumblings around the office about the future of this company, and more specifically, your job. As you know, the economy has changed for the worse and presents many challenges.

However, the good news is this: The economy doesn’t pose a threat to your job. What does threaten your job however, is the changing political landscape in this country.

However, let me tell you some little tidbits of fact which might help you decide what is in your best interests.

First, while it is easy to spew rhetoric that casts employers against employees, you have to understand that for every business owner there is a back story. This back story is often neglected and overshadowed by what you see and hear. Sure, you see me park my Mercedes outside. You’ve seen my big home at last years Christmas party. I’m sure; all these flashy icons of luxury conjure up some idealized thoughts about my life.

However, what you don’t see is the back story.

I started this company 28 years ago. At that time, I lived in a 300 square foot studio apartment for 3 years. My entire living apartment was converted into an office so I could put forth 100% effort into building a company, which by the way, would eventually employ you. My diet consisted of Ramen Pride noodles because every dollar I spent went back into this company. I drove a rusty Toyota Corolla with a defective transmission. I slept in that car when I made overnight business trips so I would not have to spend money on a hotel room. I didn’t have time to date. Often times, I stayed home on weekends, while my friends went out drinking and partying. In fact, I was married to my business — hard work, discipline, and sacrifice.

Meanwhile, my friends got jobs. They worked 40 hours a week and made a modest $50K a year and spent every dime they earned. They drove flashy cars and lived in expensive homes and wore fancy designer clothes. Instead of hitting the Nordstrom’s for the latest hot fashion item, I was trolling through the Goodwill store extracting any clothing item that didn’t look like it was birthed in the 70’s. My friends refinanced their mortgages and lived a life of luxury. I, however, did not. I put my time, my money, and my life into a business with a vision that eventually, some day, I too, will be able to afford these luxuries my friends supposedly had.

So, while you physically arrive at the office at 9am, mentally check in at about noon, and then leave at 5pm, I don’t. There is no “off” button for me. When you leave the office, you are done and you have a weekend all to yourself. I unfortunately do not have the freedom. I eat, and breathe this company every minute of the day. There is no rest. There is no weekend. There is no happy hour. Every day this business is attached to my hip like a 1 year old special-needs child.

You, of course, only see the fruits of that garden — the nice house, the Mercedes, the vacations… You never realize the back story and the sacrifices I’ve made.

Now, the economy is falling apart, and I, the guy that made all the right decisions and saved his money, have to bail-out all the people who didn’t. The people that overspent their paychecks suddenly feel entitled to the same luxuries that I earned and sacrificed a decade of my life for. Yes, business ownership has is benefits, but the price I’ve paid is steep, and not without wounds. Unfortunately, the cost of running this business, and employing you, is starting to eclipse the threshold of marginal benefit and let me tell you why:

  • I am being taxed to death and the government thinks I don’t pay enough. I have state taxes. Federal taxes. Property taxes. Sales and use taxes. Payroll taxes. Workers compensation taxes. Unemployment taxes. Taxes on taxes.
  • I have to hire a tax man to manage all these taxes and then guess what? I have to pay taxes for employing him.
  • Government mandates and regulations and all the accounting that goes with it, now occupy most of my time.
  • On Oct 15th, I wrote a check to the US Treasury for $288,000 for quarterly taxes. You know what my “stimulus” check was? Zero. Nada. Zilch.

The question I have is this: Who is stimulating the economy? Me, the guy who has provided 14 people good paying jobs and serves over 2,200,000 people per year with a flourishing business? Or, the single mother sitting at home pregnant with her fourth child waiting for her next welfare check? Obviously, government feels the latter is the economic stimulus of this country.

The fact is, if I deducted (Read: Stole) 50% of your paycheck, you’d quit, and you wouldn’t work here. I mean, why should you? That’s nuts. Who wants to get rewarded only 50% of their hard work? Well, I agree which is why your job is in jeopardy.

Here is what many of you don’t understand … to stimulate the economy you need to stimulate what runs the economy. Had suddenly government mandated to me that I didn’t need to pay taxes, guess what? Instead of depositing that $288,000 into the Washington black-hole, I would have spent it, hired more employees, and generated substantial economic growth. My employees would have enjoyed the wealth of that tax cut in the form of promotions and better salaries. But you can forget it now!

When you have a comatose man on the verge of death, you don’t defibrillate and shock his thumb thinking that will bring him back to life, do you? Or, do you defibrillate his heart? Business is at the heart of America and always has been. To restart it, you must stimulate it, not kill it. Suddenly, the power brokers in Washington believe the poor of America are the essential drivers of the American economic engine. Nothing could be further from the truth and this is the type of “CHANGE” you can keep!

So where am I going with all this? It’s quite simple.

If any new taxes are levied on me, or my company, my reaction will be swift and simple. I fire you. I fire your co-workers. You can then plead with the government to pay for your mortgage, your Webservices-Sacramento, and your child’s future. Frankly, it isn’t my problem any more.

Then, I will close this company down, move to another country, and retire. You see, I’m done. I’m done with a country that penalizes the productive, and gives to the unproductive. My motivation to work and to provide jobs will be destroyed, and with it, will be my citizenship.

If you lose your job, it won’t be at the hands of the economy; it will be at the hands of a political hurricane that swept through this country, shredded the constitution, and will have changed its landscape forever. If that happens, you can find me sitting on a beach, retired, and with no employees to worry about….

Signed,

Your boss

PS – The moral of the story? Re-read Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged

Overnight Success at Contact Synchronicity, Twenty-One Years Later

No Comments

By David Repka, C0-Founder MinneapolisDigiart

Hi, my name is Dave and I’m a deal junkie. I’ve made a living connecting people, opportunities and capital since the mid 1980s. My primary assets are the relationships, contacts and connections I have nurtured over my 26+ year career. My contact management system has evolved over the years to handle this growing network:

  • keeping business cards in a 3-ring notebook
  • then I discovered a Rolodex
  • then I discovered a Windows based computer and created my own database in Excel
  • In 1991 my friend, Jerry Rosen, showed me Act! for Windows (thanks, Jerry!) and I used that for 10+ years until it stopped syncing with my Treo 650 (remember those?)
  • I stopped using Act! and pretended Outlook was a real contact manager… it is not!
  • I switched back to the Mac platform with a MacBook Pro and pretended Entourage was a real contact manager… it is not!
  • When I replaced my Treo with an iPhone I thought Mobile Me would be the answer… it was slow and creeky… time to find a real solution…
  • In August 2009 I switched my e-mail host to Google (they host business accounts for $50 per address per year). Google has “contacts” built in. I use Google contacts and calendar to sync with my iPhone wirelessly through the cloud using exchange server (very easy to set up especially for a Microsoft product).
  • It is a simple, elegant solution that just worked until I got a new iPhone 4S and I messed up a setting or two. Rather than staying in the Google ecosystem and got fancy and tried to get one unified database from all sources and software collected over the years. Big mistake!
  • My contact database went out of control grabbing contacts through multiple platforms and devices over the last 21 years. My database had 2 to 8 duplicate records per contact and soon ballooned from about 10,000 contacts to well over 24,000.
  • I did some Google research and found an application called Scrubly that promised to fix my problem
  • I said a little prayer and purchased annual subscription for Scrubly.com for $25 then used this strategy:

1. Scrub my main contact database in BisonFinancial.com e-mail on Express setting using Scrubly (before the scrub the software backs up the database to their cloud which is nice)

2. Turn off Exchange Server contact sync radio button in iPhone & iPad so they are “out of the loop”

3. Export a backup of all contacts from Mac Address Book to SugarSync – Backup all contacts from Dave@BisonFinancial.com on Google Apps to SugarSync (that way I had a backup to the backup – a little anal retentive, but my contacts are the lifeblood of my business)

4. Go into Address Book on the Mac and DELETE them all (yes, delete them all)

5. Delete all contacts on iPhone – after struggling to do this in iTunes I bought app for $0.99 called DeleteQ (they are the number 15 app in Spain so how bad could that be?) that deleted all my contacts from my iPhone (it timed out a few times and needed to be restarted, but it deleted close to 12,000 contacts)

6. Do a hard reset of iPhone and iPad (just in case)

7. Reset Radio Button on iPhone and iPad to Sync with Exchange Server

8. 9,777 contacts on BisonFinancial.com – iPad – iPhone perfectly SYNCHRONIZED for the first time ever! Yes, ever! Thanks Scrubly!

Now if I could only figure out how to get all this to sync with the Apple iCloud and all the social media connections I’ve built through LinkedIn, Twitter & Facebook! But, I’ll worry about that another day.

Young Men with Unlimited Capital Seek Compelling Investment Opportunities

3 Comments

By David Repka

In an earlier blog post I mentioned my relationship with a “socially conscious” investor looking to invest equity in companies (and commercial real estate projects) that can get Floridians back to work.  If that post was the view from 50,000 feet let me bring the view down to 10,000 feet so some additional details can be seen. We have been honored to view dozens of business plans and have clarified what our investors like and more importantly, what they don’t like. What we like so far:

    • Medical Practice Management Companies (Dental – Urgent Care – specialty)
    • Medical Office Buildings in close proximity to hospitals
    • Assisted Living Facilities (ALFs) / Memory Care Facilities
    • Hotels (2.5 star or better – we would call newer, purpose built Holiday Inn Express / Hilton Garden Inn the base of what we are seeking)
    • Single Tenant Retail Leased to Credit Tenants / Small Retail Centers Leased to Nationally Known Tenants / Retail Shopping Centers that are Old, Tired, Riddled with Vacancies and Need a Refresh
    • Green Businesses focused on Recycling & Sustainable Practices
    • Open to new ideas that are logical, repeatable and scalable

Florida is first… Texas is next!

While the politicians in Washington and on the campaign trail talk and talk about creating jobs, I’m aligned with investors that are actually writing checks. If you have an opportunity to discuss please call me, send me an email or a connection request on LinkedIn. Our investors obviously can’t do every deal, but promise to review your presentation quickly and get you a definitive “yes” or “no” answer rather than a long, drawn out “maybe”.

“We Are Wall Street”: The Top 1% Are Mad as Hell and Fighting Back!

2 Comments

Like a scene out of Atlas Shrugged…

Wall Streeters recently struck back by dropping leaflets on the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Here’s what the leaflets said:

“We are Wall Street. It’s our job to make money. Whether it’s a commodity, stock, bond, or some hypothetical piece of fake paper, it doesn’t matter. We would trade baseball cards if it were profitable. I didn’t hear America complaining when the market was roaring to 14,000 and everyone’s 401k doubled every 3 years. Just like gambling, it’s not a problem until you lose. I’ve never heard of anyone going to Gamblers Anonymous because they won too much in Vegas.

Well now the market crapped out, & even though it has come back some whatever, the government and the average Joes are still looking for a scapegoat. God knows there has to be one for everything. Well, here we are.

Go ahead and continue to take us down, but you’re only going to hurt yourselves. What’s going to happen when we can’t find jobs on the Street anymore? Guess what: We’re going to take yours. We get up at 4am and work till 10pm or later. We’re used to not getting up to pee when we have a position. We don’t take an hour or more for a lunch break. We don’t’ demand a union. We don’t retire at 50 with a pension. We eat what we kill, and when the only thing left to eat is on your dinner plates, we’ll eat that.

For years teachers and other unionized labor have had us fooled. We were too busy working to notice. Do you really think that we are incapable of teaching 3rd graders and doing landscaping? We’re going to take your cushy jobs with tenure and 4 months off a year whine just like you that we are so-o-o-o underpaid for building the youth of America. Say goodbye to your overtime and double time and half. I’ll be hitting grounders to the high school baseball team to $5k extra a summer, thank you very much. So now that we’re going to be making $8k a year without upside, Joe Main street is going to have his revenge right? Wrong! Guess what: we’re going to stop buying the new 80k car, we aren’t going to leave the 35 percent tip at our business dinners anymore. No more free rides on our backs. We’re going to landscape our own back yards, wash our cars with a garden hose in our driveways. Our money was your money. You spent it. When our money dries up, so does yours.

The difference is, you lived off of it, we rejoiced in it. The Obama administration and the Democratic National Committee might get their way and knock us off the top of the pyramid, but its really going to hurt like hell for them when our fat a**es land directly on the middle class of America and knock them to the bottom. We aren’t dinosaurs. We are smarter and more vicious than that, and we are going to survive. The question is, now that Obama & his administration are making Joe Main street our food supply…will he? And will they?”

PS – When you are ready to stop complaining and ready to start thinking like a billionaire… follow this link to reserve your copy of “The Billionaire Mindset”

A Different Take on the Richest 1%

1 Comment

My inbox has been bombed with e-mails from folks outraged by the wealth disparity between the richest 1% and the balance of America. A few bullet points:

  1. The Top 1 Percent of Americans Owns 40 Percent of the Nation’s Wealth
  2. The Top 1 Percent of Americans Take Home 24 Percent of National Income
  3. The Top 1 Percent Of Americans Own Half of the Country’s Stocks, Bonds and Mutual Funds
  4. The Top 1 Percent Of Americans Have Only 5 Percent of the Nation’s Personal Debt
  5. The Top 1 Percent are Taking In More of the Nation’s Income Than at Any Other Time Since the 1920s

I wondered what it would take to be in the “Richest 1%” certainly these are the  “jet owners” our President has vilified. When you do the research it takes an annual family income over $200,000 to qualify for the richest 1%. As someone who has spent his professional career “playing Monopoly” with multi-millionaires and deca-millionaires in the commercial real estate investment, development and finance industry the admission standards to be included in the top 1% seem appallingly low and describes nearly everyone I’ve ever dealt with over my business career.

The “Occupy Wall Street” folks want to take the wealth of the Richest 1% and redistribute it to “the people”. If that were allowed to happen I can guarantee that within 5 or 10 years the folks that had their wealth stolen from them will get it back. How will they do this? Because they have mastered intellectual, personal and financial discipline.

PORTRAIT OF A MILLIONAIRE [1]

Who is the prototypical member of the Richest 1% You may be surprises to learn what the typical American millionaire can tell you about himself?(*)

* I am a fifty-seven-year-old male, married with three children. About 70 percent of us earn 80 percent or more of our household’s income.

* About one in five of us is retired. About two-thirds of us who are working are self-employed. Interestingly, self-employed people make up less than 20 percent of the workers in America but account for two-thirds of the millionaires. Also, three out of four of us who are self-employed consider ourselves to be entrepreneurs. Most of the others are self-employed professionals, such as doctors and accountants.

* Many of the types of businesses we are in could be classified as dullnormal. We are welding contractors, auctioneers, rice farmers, owners of mobile-home parks, pest controllers, coin and stamp dealers, and paving contractors.

* About half of our wives do not work outside the home. The number-one occupation for those wives who do work is teacher.

* Our household’s total annual realized (taxable) income is $131,000 (median, or 50th percentile), while our average income is $247,000. Note that those of us who have incomes in the $500,000 to $999,999 category (8 percent) and the $1 million or more category (5 percent) skew the average upward.

* We have an average household net worth of $3.7 million. Of course, some of our cohorts have accumulated much more. Nearly 6 percent have a net worth of over $10 million. Again, these people skew our average upward. The typical (median, or 50th percentile) millionaire household has a net worth of $1.6 million.

* On average, our total annual realized income is less than 7 percent of our wealth. In other words, we live on less than 7 percent of our wealth.

* Most of us (97 percent) are homeowners. We live in homes currently valued at an average of $320,000. About half of us have occupied the same home for more than twenty years. Thus, we have enjoyed significant increases in the value of our homes.

* Most of us have never felt at a disadvantage because we did not receive any inheritance. About 80 percent of us are first-generation affluent.

* We live well below our means. We wear inexpensive suits and drive American-made cars. Only a minority of us drive the current-model-year automobile. Only a minority ever lease our motor vehicles.

* Most of our wives are planners and meticulous budgeters. In fact, only 18 percent of us disagreed with the statement “Charity begins at home.” Most of us will tell you that our wives are a lot more conservative with money than we are.

* We have a “go-to-hell fund.” In other words, we have accumulated enough wealth to live without working for ten or more years. Thus, those of us with a net worth of $1.6 million could live comfortably for more than twelve years. Actually, we could live longer than that, since we save at least 15 percent of our earned income.

* We have more than six and one-half times the level of wealth of our nonmillionaire neighbors, but, in our neighborhood, these nonmillionaires outnumber us better than three to one. Could it be that they have chosen to trade wealth for acquiring high-status material possessions?

* As a group, we are fairly well educated. Only about one in five are not college graduates. Many of us hold advanced degrees. Eighteen percent have master’s degrees, 8 percent law degrees, 6 percent medical degrees, and 6 percent Ph.D.s.

* Only 17 percent of us or our spouses ever attended a private elementary or private high school. But 55 percent of our children are currently attending or have attended private schools.

* As a group, we believe that education is extremely important for ourselves, our children, and our grandchildren. We spend heavily for the educations of our offspring.

* About two-thirds of us work between forty-five and fifty-five hours per week.

* We are fastidious investors. On average, we invest nearly 20 percent of our household realized income each year. Most of us invest at least 15 percent. Seventy-nine percent of us have at least one account with a brokerage company. But we make our own investment decisions.

* We hold nearly 20 percent of our household’s wealth in transaction securities such as publicly traded stocks and mutual funds. But we rarely sell our equity investments. We hold even more in our pension plans. On average, 21 percent of our household’s wealth is in our private businesses.

* As a group, we feel that our daughters are financially handicapped in comparison to our sons. Men seem to make much more money even within the same occupational categories. That is why most of us would not hesitate to share some of our wealth with our daughters. Our sons, and men in general, have the deck of economic cards stacked in their favor. They should not need subsidies from their parents.

* What would be the ideal occupations for our sons and daughters? There are about 3.5 millionaire households like ours. Our numbers are growing much faster than the general population. Our kids should consider providing affluent people with some valuable service. Overall, our most trusted financial advisors are our accountants. Our attorneys are also very important. So we recommend accounting and law to our children. Tax advisors and estate-planning experts will be in big demand over the next fifteen years.

* I am a tightwad. That’s one of the main reasons I completed a long questionnaire for a crispy $1 bill. Why else would I spend two or three hours being personally interviewed by these authors? They paid me $100, $200, or $250. Oh, they made me another offer–to donate in my name the money I earned for my interview to my favorite charity. But I told them, “I am my favorite charity.”

If you would like to know more about Millionaires and Billionaires – follow this link to reserve a complementary copy of my white paper titled “The Billionaire Mindset: Zen and the Art of Business”.

[1] Source Material for this article from The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley, Ph.D and William D. Danko, Ph.D

Visit this link for the complete article on wealth disparity by Dr. G. William Domhoff

 

 

 

 

What is more important to get our economy back on track? Jobs or availability of capital?

No Comments

I think that this is a bit of a chicken and egg question, but I think that the answer is availability of capital. Hard for a company to expand, buy equipment, rent more space AND hire new employees if they can not get access to capital.

Since the collapse of the global financial markets in September 2008 I’ve focused my energy on building relationships with alternative capital sources (hedge funds, private equity groups & CRDs – Certified Rich Dudes). I’ve been searching for a simple, scalable, brainless program to represent and ramp up a focused pipeline. I found it!

My plan for creating a supplemental income stream in areas outside my core strength of income producing commercial real estate is to focus on the capital needs of small businesses that have been shut out from obtaining funding from traditional sources. The personal credit of many of these business owners has been decimated by the global financial meltdown. My focus is to connect people, opportunities and capital.

We are creating a small business lending platform under www.Loan4Biz.com and would love your feedback on the programs we are establishing:

  • Owner Occupied Commercial real estate loans (SBA & non-SBA funds)
  • Factoring Accounts Receivable
  • Unsecured working capital loans from $5-100,000 * (credit score from 500)
  • Unsecured working capital loans for from $50,000+  ** (credit score from 720)
  • Merchant Cash Advances against credit card receivables for companies that can not qualify for a working capital loan

My partner, Lyn Matteson, has over 25 years of experience in corporate finance with august lenders like KeyBank and Charter One bank responsible for over 250 business development officers.

Send me an e-mail or call 727-537-0330 if you see a potential strategic alliance (or if you need access to capital).

Footnotes:
* Lyn has closed 31+ unsecured working capital loans with an innovative small balance lender. Sweet spot is loans in the $25-100,000 range. Simple, one page application and logical, repeatable process. Read more: http://loan4biz.com/loans/working-capital-loans

** Must have excellent credit and strong global cash flow. This is a wealth management product with no upper limit on the loan amount.

Google Call will save us $250 a month

No Comments

My brother, Jared, and I run a 2-person real estate advisory firm out of a small office in historical Downtown St. Petersburg, FL. We started using Google Voice a year ago and we have been very pleased with this free service and how it has simplified people getting in touch with us and leaving voice mail messages in individual voice mail boxes (rather than calling office, mobile and home) and then sending transcribed voice to text e-mails and voice to text messages to our mobile phones.

As our confidence in the SanDiegoDigiart service grew, we’ve ruthlessly cut features and services from our Verizon office phone system. Google Call is their newest free service. Google Call lets you make phone calls to any type of telephone directly thru your computer rather than it needing to bounce to a land line (or mobile phone). It will let us go from 6 land lines to 1 land line (just so we can keep our legacy phone that’s we’ve used for 10+ years). This astonishing free service will let us reduce our Verizon phone bill about $250 a month. That $3,000 a year savings is meaningful to a small business.

Thanks, Google!